Posts tagged ‘Urban Planning Strategy’

The recipe for urban decay has flopped

Written August 26th, 2015 by

Inner City SlumsNew Geography published an article: Australia’s Recipe For Urban Decay written by Clinton Stiles-Schmidt. This article is critical of Australia’s urban planning policy to establish high-density urban living in our cities. The article speculates this strategy will result in neighbourhoods that have slum-like conditions, social tension, and perpetual poverty for their residents.

The article projects property investors having a speculative investment strategy, willing to neglect their investments by not performing ongoing maintenance. This results in deterioration of their properties and the surrounding neighbourhood. This will be most prevalent in areas with high-density housing, as investors are predominatly the buyers, paying higher prices to buy units/apartments.  This forces owner occupiers and first home buyers out of that market and further erodes housing quality because investors will not perform the necessary upkeep of their properties. We disagree.

There are several things wrong with the article’s assertions.  We feel Clinton has assumed some of the characteristics that occur in the US property market also apply to the Australian market and this is not the case. Read the rest of this entry »

Is the postcode dead?

Written May 25th, 2015 by

what3words sydney opera houseLondon-based start-up what3words (w3w) has devised a new addressing system.  The system divides the entire world into a grid of 3m by 3m squares — 57 trillion of them in total. Each square has been labelled with a three word sequence. Although GPS services can already accurately pinpoint any location on earth, the w3w system provides a three-word code that makes it easier to remember and communicate with people over using complicated latitude and longitude coördinates.

Standing on the steps of the Sydney Opera House? You are at “maple.help.blows”. Want to direct someone to the table you are sitting at in the Brisbane City Botanical Gardens? Tell them to proceed to “preoccupied.horn.onions”. Climb to the top of Mount Everest. That is “ablaze.newsstand.unattactive” Read the rest of this entry »

3D city planning

Written February 17th, 2015 by

3D Modelling

Now with the latest geospatial technology and the increased processing power of computer hardware, 3D modelling is feasible and requires much less time and effort. Directions Magazine has an article that explores a 3D modelling approach: Three-dimensional City Planning Using Photogrammetry and GIS. The article describes how photogrammetric data and GIS software tools are used to produce 3D city models.

These models enable the study of complex urban environment and find solutions for various threats and challenges involved with urbanisation. Especially in Asia, where issues such has: exponential population growth and in-migration of poor people, industrial growth, inefficient and inadequate traffic corridors, lack of services and amenities and solid waste generation, are having adverse impacts on human life in city environments.   3D modelling and visualisation systems support the decision making process allowing quick evaluation and communication of ideas, leading to better urban planning and administration outcomes.

Closer to home, Brisbane City Council has developed a spatially accurate and interactive 3D model of Brisbane City’s CBD and inner 5 kilometres.  The 3D model is known as Virtual Brisbane.  It is an important strategic planning, development assessment and community engagement tool that is use by the Council. Read the rest of this entry »

Growing cities become less dense

Written January 30th, 2015 by

Cities become less denseThere is a misbelief among those in the press and some urban analysts that as cities become larger they become more densely populated. The article World Megacities: Densities fall as they become larger published by newgeography indicates the opposite is true.

newgeography builds on the groundbreaking work (such as in Planet of Cities) performed by New York University geographer, Professor Shlomo Angel. newgeography concluded population densities were falling in each of the 34 mega cities analysed.  One example was London. Even though urban sprawl is heavily constrained by greenbelts created following World War II, “London’s density is estimated to have dropped by two-thirds”. Read the rest of this entry »