Posts tagged ‘Model Preparation’

3D city planning

Written February 17th, 2015 by

3D Modelling

Now with the latest geospatial technology and the increased processing power of computer hardware, 3D modelling is feasible and requires much less time and effort. Directions Magazine has an article that explores a 3D modelling approach: Three-dimensional City Planning Using Photogrammetry and GIS. The article describes how photogrammetric data and GIS software tools are used to produce 3D city models.

These models enable the study of complex urban environment and find solutions for various threats and challenges involved with urbanisation. Especially in Asia, where issues such has: exponential population growth and in-migration of poor people, industrial growth, inefficient and inadequate traffic corridors, lack of services and amenities and solid waste generation, are having adverse impacts on human life in city environments.   3D modelling and visualisation systems support the decision making process allowing quick evaluation and communication of ideas, leading to better urban planning and administration outcomes.

Closer to home, Brisbane City Council has developed a spatially accurate and interactive 3D model of Brisbane City’s CBD and inner 5 kilometres.  The 3D model is known as Virtual Brisbane.  It is an important strategic planning, development assessment and community engagement tool that is use by the Council. Read the rest of this entry »

Growing cities become less dense

Written January 30th, 2015 by

Cities become less denseThere is a misbelief among those in the press and some urban analysts that as cities become larger they become more densely populated. The article World Megacities: Densities fall as they become larger published by newgeography indicates the opposite is true.

newgeography builds on the groundbreaking work (such as in Planet of Cities) performed by New York University geographer, Professor Shlomo Angel. newgeography concluded population densities were falling in each of the 34 mega cities analysed.  One example was London. Even though urban sprawl is heavily constrained by greenbelts created following World War II, “London’s density is estimated to have dropped by two-thirds”. Read the rest of this entry »

50,000 new dwellings along Parramatta Road

Written December 8th, 2014 by

New Parramatta Rd Urban RenewalThe NSW Government has released the Draft Parramatta Road Urban Renewal Strategy. The Government is aiming for 50,000 new dwellings and 50,000 jobs in the Parramatta Road corridor by 2050. With eight suburbs/precincts targeted for development and jobs growth.

I am always a bit sceptical about claims made by government when comes to population and employment projections. The high level assumptions these claims are based on tend to be very optimistic.  When you start to apply them on the ground there are constraints (such as easements, property frontages and network infrastructure capacity) that apply at a property level and restrict what growth will be achieved. Read the rest of this entry »

Why flatten the cadastre

Written November 16th, 2014 by

Flatten the cadastreOne of the things you need to determine for an urban growth model is how much more development capacity is available on a property.  In some situations this can be easy to find. For example a property with a single detached house that can be demolished and replaced with multiple attached dwelling units.   The challenge comes when a property consists of common property with multiple attached dwellings or commercial units.

If you treat dwellings/units as individual properties when they are part of a larger building complex or site, there is every chance the attributes of these individual properties would not meet development density criteria that apply to that site. Thus, the model would determine no further development growth could occur at that site. In many instances these sites have further development potential.  Some examples include: an old block of units that can be demolished and replaced with a high-rise unit complex; a site that is being developed in stages over several years and is only part way through delivery of those stages.  Read the rest of this entry »