Posts tagged ‘Forecaz Modeller’

Forecaz helps students gain practical experience

Written July 21st, 2017 by

Nicholas Patorniti-Bradley Rasmussen-Chris Teitzel

USC lecturer Nicholas Patorniti, Sizztech Managing Director Bradley Rasmussen and Unitywater Strategic Planning Officer Chris Teitzel.

Sizztech and Unitywater have helped University of the Sunshine Coast town planning and engineering students gain practical experience by providing data, software and real-life infrastructure scenarios as part of their course work.

Students undertaking ENP336 Strategic Infrastructure Planning have been able to merge their studies with industry-specific information and solve problems using a simplified version of Unitywater’s demand forecasting models.

The software, developed by Sizztech, has been used at Unitywater for three years and models where future population and employment growth will occur, when it will occur and by how much. It helps town planners and utilities providers know what infrastructure to provide, and when.
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Time for urban farming in cities to reduce obesity

Written June 26th, 2015 by

Urban FarmingIn 2005 over 40 % of the Earth’s land was given over to agriculture. This is an area of roughly 4.6 billion hectares, about the size of South America.  A further 3.2 to 3.6 billion hectares is being used to raise livestock. By 2050 up to 80% of the earth’s population will live in urban centres. If food is to be produced and consumed in the same inefficient way as is today, we will need further arable farm land the size of Brazil to support this population.

The best farming lands are already cultivated. Further increasing the agricultural land area will come with great environmental consequences, such as: destroying valuable natural ecosystems; water pollution from nutrient run-off; and soil erosion. New agricultural models are required. These models need to use new technology to improve cropping productivity while reducing the use of water and the application of fertilizer and other potentially harmful chemicals. Read the rest of this entry »

High density without occupancy

Written April 9th, 2015 by

High density apartmentsThe article High density housing’s biggest myth by Ross Elliott published on The Pulse, suggests many high-rise apartments recently constructed or being constructed contain numerous apartments that are vacant or not occupied, particularly in the inner city areas. We have observed this trend with high density residential properties when developing urban growth models.  This trend imposes the requirement for urban models to provide for properties in some locations not being fully occupied. In some cases this can be as low as 20% occupancy. These low percentages are normally seen in holiday areas such as the Gold Coast or Sunshine Coast.

With the apartments in these high-rise buildings, Ross suggests “many are vacant: simply locked up and not used by their owners (often overseas buyers)”. Whilst this will be true for some apartments, other apartments are being utilised for short-term accommodation. These apartments are available as serviced apartments or short-term rentals and this type of land use should be accounted for in your urban growth modelling. Read the rest of this entry »

How to establish a baseline

Written July 7th, 2014 by

Baseline image

The baseline is the most important element of an urban growth model.  Actually, this statement applies to any model. The baseline establishes the reference point from which a model will forecast future growth.  Not having an accurate baseline will result in your model either over or under allocating urban growth, especially in the early projection year cohorts.

Normally your baseline can be derived from the existing land uses of cadastral land parcels within the area that is subject to the urban growth model.  You might think establishing a baseline for a large cadastral model is a very challenging task.  Actually with today’s digital geospatial tools it is relatively easy. Although it is still time-consuming.

So how do you go about creating a baseline? Read the rest of this entry »